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Katrina Hamel
Katrina Hamel
3 months ago

That story of the children’s reenactment and how we automatically assume that even righteous anger is a bad thing is so prevalent in our world today. Yet, when we are brought face-to-face with unbearable sin, we want God to be angry and to swoop in and act for the innocent. I find that Psalm 18 paints this picture really clearly for me.

KellyRBaker
KellyRBaker
3 months ago

Very well written, Lesley. This subject is much understood. Thanks for bringing truth here. We tend to forget that Jesus is God.

Patsy Burnette
Patsy Burnette
3 months ago

Great post! He is the same, yesterday, today, and forever! So comforting to know this with confidence!

Thanks for linking up at InstaEncouragements!

Laurie
Laurie
3 months ago

I think there are examples of an angry God in the New Testament and a loving God in the Old Testament, but you are right – the perception is angry God in the OT, loving God in the NT. I think, since we are made in the image of God, and we have both anger and kindness, it only makes sense that God has both of those traits too.

Theresa Boedeker
Theresa Boedeker
3 months ago

People like to simplify God and say he was angry in the OT and Loving in the NT. But when I sat down and read the bible, the story in chronological order, I was struck by how loving and kind God was in the OT. And how his mercy was above and beyond. When I read some of the stories, I thought to myself, I wouldn’t have put up with these shenanigans for so long. I kept seeing him as being more lenient than most of us would have been.

Anita Ojeda
Anita Ojeda
3 months ago

Thank you for such a clear explanation–I’ve been reading through the minor prophets lately and noticed the theme of both anger, compassion, and mercy for an unruly people.

Fiona
Fiona
3 months ago

Good explanation Lesley. Love that at the cross anger and mercy meet. X

Barbara Harper
Barbara Harper
3 months ago

I’m so glad you brought out that compassion and mercy are in the OT and righteous judgment is in the NT. The Bible is a unit, but we tend to compartmentalize it. And I think we can understand God’s anger toward sin if we imagine how we’d feel if someone was going to harm or lead astray our children. Our mama-bear protection would rightfully rise up to protect and defend them. We can go too far or have the wrong perspective, but God is perfectly balanced.

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Merry Ohler
Merry Ohler
4 months ago

“Jesus’ passion for His Father’s house was the driving force behind His rage at its misuse. God’s love for people is manifested in His anger when He sees them being mistreated or abused. If He failed to be angry over these things, then He would fail to be wholly loving.“

Yes! This is exactly right. Your comment that “His anger is an expression of His love,” because He is love, is on point. Thank you for sharing this so succinctly.

Briana M Almengor
4 months ago

I love how you drew out the truth that God’s anger is an expression of His love, so unlike our own which is why, I think, it can be such a difficult attribute of God’s to appreciate and embrace as good.

Melodye
4 months ago

This is so good!

“Even as His anger against sin is poured out, His grace in sending Jesus to bear it in our place assures us of His perfect love.“